Don’t say DiCoDE anymore, say DICoDE

I know, it is subtle… but important! Working through the methodology I am putting in place using both DiCoDE (strategies) and DIRT (business models) and testing it on the Digital Music ecosystems, I realized my model is not just about distribution of the digital content but increasingly also about its consumption. Communication about this content also, but I’ll come back to it later…

Going through my discussions with Julien from Laid Back (especially related to our Radio 2.0 Manifesto), this blog post from Board of Innovation mapping the music sector ecosystem, some of my previous foresight on the topic (not yet available online due to technical restrictions) and filling the new DiCoDE model/canvas on the topic for adding it as an example in my book, I realized, just like Gerd Leonhard keeps on saying, that models move from ownership into access to content. Digital Music’s future (as all the buzz about Apple having bought Lala.com, building a server farm and being about to launch a subscription-based iTunes in the cloud service seems to show it) is closer to services like Spotify, Last.FM or Deezer than the current dOWNload model. I still need to tackle the piracy dimension in the model/canvas, as you can see…

Music is not only downloaded to the device but is embedded in an experience that requires much more players working in harmony: the device (and its OS), the browser or playing app, the web service, the connectivity, the content and the aggregation and/or social features. It means that Carriers can hope to enter the game again and that the content provider can upgrade its role from raw material provider to service. Giving more value, and eligible for capturing more value too… I’m working on this Business Model dimension now, based on (and improving) DIRT model. Of course, all feedback is welcome!

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